track/cross country scholarships
05/09/2011 6:30:37 PM
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Why do parent's have the mistaken idea that runner's recieve full scholarships to colleges? Private schools give more money but they cost much more. Public colleges give very little to males and a little more to females, but no where near the full cost like football players receive.
Why do parent's have the mistaken idea that runner's recieve full scholarships to colleges? Private schools give more money but they cost much more. Public colleges give very little to males and a little more to females, but no where near the full cost like football players receive.
05/09/2011 7:54:17 PM
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@chocomom I agree, there's a lot of fantasy out there. The only three sports that routinely give full scholarships, that I'm aware of, are football, basketball, and womens' volleyball. Schools only have 12.5 scholarships for men and 12.5 scholarships for women to cover the entire track and cross country program, and that's only if they're fully funded (which many programs are not).
@chocomom I agree, there's a lot of fantasy out there. The only three sports that routinely give full scholarships, that I'm aware of, are football, basketball, and womens' volleyball. Schools only have 12.5 scholarships for men and 12.5 scholarships for women to cover the entire track and cross country program, and that's only if they're fully funded (which many programs are not).
05/09/2011 9:49:49 PM
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@CoachGeorgeRJR I wish someone would write a book about how to go about this college scholarship process. We've had to learn as we go. If you want scholarship money you need to make sure your child concentrates on their grades as much or more as they do with their running. I've tried to tell this to high school cross country/track parents, but they look at me like they don't believe me. I think some high school coaches even help to make this full scholarship myth worse.
@CoachGeorgeRJR
I wish someone would write a book about how to go about this college scholarship process. We've had to learn as we go. If you want scholarship money you need to make sure your child concentrates on their grades as much or more as they do with their running. I've tried to tell this to high school cross country/track parents, but they look at me like they don't believe me. I think some high school coaches even help to make this full scholarship myth worse.
05/09/2011 10:48:35 PM
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@chocomom DyeStat's Recruiting Guide http://archive.dyestat.com//?pg=usCollege-Choices-Articles-An-Overview
@chocomom

DyeStat's Recruiting Guide
http://archive.dyestat.com//?pg=usCollege-Choices-Articles-An-Overview
05/09/2011 10:52:28 PM
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@chocomom Words from a Texas a@m coach, The conversation was based on the boys 400 meters. A school can offer 18 scholarships for girls (ranging from 50-100%) depending on how a runner compares to his or her graduating class and the needs of the university. Boys scholarships are 8-12 with scholarships also ranging from 50-100%. He broke down money as follows 46-47 sec 400m (85%-100%)48-49 (75%-84%), under those times you go 50% and lower. Ususlly schools will see how much aid students would qualify. There are schools that will give the top 50 the equivalent of a full ride. Schools have numerous ways of giving athletes money, I went through it with my son back in 2005.
@chocomom Words from a Texas a@m coach, The conversation was based on the boys 400 meters. A school can offer 18 scholarships for girls (ranging from 50-100%) depending on how a runner compares to his or her graduating class and the needs of the university. Boys scholarships are 8-12 with scholarships also ranging from 50-100%. He broke down money as follows 46-47 sec 400m (85%-100%)48-49 (75%-84%), under those times you go 50% and lower. Ususlly schools will see how much aid students would qualify. There are schools that will give the top 50 the equivalent of a full ride. Schools have numerous ways of giving athletes money, I went through it with my son back in 2005.
05/10/2011 5:09:48 PM
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@gbocmusic Thank you for the website. I would have loved to read this a couple of years ago. I talked to a parent of college recruiter at an indoor meet this year and he said that even UNC didn't give full athletic scholarships to runners. That if it was a "full ride" it had to be a combination of athletic, academic, and financial aid. We were very fortunate to have this for our older daughter, but at the time we learned that the hard way. Good thing our daughter was a good student :) I know another runner going on scholarship to run and they are only getting 1,000.00 for the year. They have great times but not so great grades and that is just how it is. Thanks for all your imput.
@gbocmusic Thank you for the website. I would have loved to read this a couple of years ago. I talked to a parent of college recruiter at an indoor meet this year and he said that even UNC didn't give full athletic scholarships to runners. That if it was a "full ride" it had to be a combination of athletic, academic, and financial aid. We were very fortunate to have this for our older daughter, but at the time we learned that the hard way. Good thing our daughter was a good student :) I know another runner going on scholarship to run and they are only getting 1,000.00 for the year. They have great times but not so great grades and that is just how it is. Thanks for all your imput.
05/11/2011 10:54:17 AM
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Joined: Apr 2010
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@chocomom This is a really good question and kudos to you for bringing it up. Many parents of athletes don't understand the basics: Division III schools don't give athletic scholarships at all, and many Division I schools don't either. Scholarships for track and field are rare and highly competitive. You need to start talking to college coaches in your athlete's junior year (or earlier), register with the NCAA, ask your high school coach to respond to all contacts or letters from colleges and forward them to you, etc. If your athlete is truly one of the best in the country in one or more events, it will be easier - but many, probably most, accomplished track and field athletes who end up competing in college get no scholarship money at all. If you want to pay zero tuition for college, the best way to do this is to become a National Merit Finalist, i.e., to do very well on the PSAT. Obviously this isn't easy, but it amazes me that at many high schools they tell kids "don't worry about the PSAT, don't study for it", when in fact it is a very important test that helps determine who is eligible for BIG scholarship money later on. Some colleges give automatic full rides to National Merit Finalists who identify the college as their first choice. So, if you want money for college, don't just run fast (or jump high or throw far) and get good grades. Prepare for the PSAT and also the SAT or ACT. Just one mom's advice.
@chocomom This is a really good question and kudos to you for bringing it up. Many parents of athletes don't understand the basics: Division III schools don't give athletic scholarships at all, and many Division I schools don't either. Scholarships for track and field are rare and highly competitive. You need to start talking to college coaches in your athlete's junior year (or earlier), register with the NCAA, ask your high school coach to respond to all contacts or letters from colleges and forward them to you, etc. If your athlete is truly one of the best in the country in one or more events, it will be easier - but many, probably most, accomplished track and field athletes who end up competing in college get no scholarship money at all.

If you want to pay zero tuition for college, the best way to do this is to become a National Merit Finalist, i.e., to do very well on the PSAT. Obviously this isn't easy, but it amazes me that at many high schools they tell kids "don't worry about the PSAT, don't study for it", when in fact it is a very important test that helps determine who is eligible for BIG scholarship money later on. Some colleges give automatic full rides to National Merit Finalists who identify the college as their first choice. So, if you want money for college, don't just run fast (or jump high or throw far) and get good grades. Prepare for the PSAT and also the SAT or ACT. Just one mom's advice.
05/11/2011 10:30:13 PM
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@gohsrunners Thanks, I so agree with everything you said. I wish all the parents would receive this information when their children start high school :)
@gohsrunners Thanks, I so agree with everything you said. I wish all the parents would receive this information when their children start high school :)
05/12/2011 3:51:43 PM
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Some of these websites, including the one you're reading, perpetuate the myth that so many student-athletes are receiving a lot of money in athletic scholarships. There are people listed going to NCAA Div. 3 schools on mile split's "signings" list and they can't possibly have signed a LOI. Here's one more bit of advice, check out the NJCAA schools and the smaller NCAA Div. 2s. They often have more money and definitely money for student athletes who aren't capable of meeting Div. 1 standards straight out of high school. Wake Tech Comm. College is starting a new XC program in North Carolina for this fall. Next closest is Spartanburg Methodist College in South Carolina with cross country scholarships and club (non scholarship) track and then Chattahoochee Tech College in Georgia, which has cross country and scholarship-level track. There are many more schools spread across the country.
Some of these websites, including the one you're reading, perpetuate the myth that so many student-athletes are receiving a lot of money in athletic scholarships.

There are people listed going to NCAA Div. 3 schools on mile split's "signings" list and they can't possibly have signed a LOI.

Here's one more bit of advice, check out the NJCAA schools and the smaller NCAA Div. 2s. They often have more money and definitely money for student athletes who aren't capable of meeting Div. 1 standards straight out of high school.

Wake Tech Comm. College is starting a new XC program in North Carolina for this fall. Next closest is Spartanburg Methodist College in South Carolina with cross country scholarships and club (non scholarship) track and then Chattahoochee Tech College in Georgia, which has cross country and scholarship-level track.

There are many more schools spread across the country.
05/12/2011 3:54:04 PM
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[quote=chocomom]@CoachGeorgeRJR We've had to learn as we go. If you want scholarship money you need to make sure your child concentrates on their grades as much or more as they do with their running. I've tried to tell this to high school cross country/track parents, but they look at me like they don't believe me. I think some high school coaches even help to make this full scholarship myth worse.[/quote] @chocomom This is very true and I hope parents and student listen. My college often gives students $10,000-$15,000 in academic money if they have great grades and high SAT/ACT scores yet the most we give any single runner -- including our national champion -- is $3,000.
chocomom wrote:
@CoachGeorgeRJR
We've had to learn as we go. If you want scholarship money you need to make sure your child concentrates on their grades as much or more as they do with their running. I've tried to tell this to high school cross country/track parents, but they look at me like they don't believe me. I think some high school coaches even help to make this full scholarship myth worse.


@chocomom

This is very true and I hope parents and student listen.

My college often gives students $10,000-$15,000 in academic money if they have great grades and high SAT/ACT scores yet the most we give any single runner -- including our national champion -- is $3,000.
05/13/2011 9:54:24 AM
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@OnceARunnr You make really good points about investigating other scholastic-athletic options besides D I and D III. I agree with all your points except that I don't think milesplit's "college signings" should be restricted to kids who have signed LOI's - but you are right it is a bit misleading. Maybe it should be renamed "college commitments" or "college decisions" and then it would be clear that it includes all student-athletes who have committed to competing in college. Certainly, not all the athletes listed under the "college signings" section are getting athletic scholarships!
@OnceARunnr You make really good points about investigating other scholastic-athletic options besides D I and D III. I agree with all your points except that I don't think milesplit's "college signings" should be restricted to kids who have signed LOI's - but you are right it is a bit misleading. Maybe it should be renamed "college commitments" or "college decisions" and then it would be clear that it includes all student-athletes who have committed to competing in college. Certainly, not all the athletes listed under the "college signings" section are getting athletic scholarships!
05/13/2011 10:30:48 PM
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@OnceARunnr You have just given the best reason for why they are called STUDENT athletes!! Our son ran at ASU and got only a small amount (for year 5 because of injuries) because he was a NC Teaching Fellow (academic based). This allowed him to go "free" for four years. Study,study,study!!!! Coach Peeps:-)
@OnceARunnr
You have just given the best reason for why they are called STUDENT athletes!! Our son ran at ASU and got only a small amount (for year 5 because of injuries) because he was a NC Teaching Fellow (academic based). This allowed him to go "free" for four years. Study,study,study!!!!

Coach Peeps
05/14/2011 12:05:04 AM
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@OnceARunnr Are you talking about a national championship runner out of high school?
@OnceARunnr Are you talking about a national championship runner out of high school?
05/19/2011 7:37:21 PM
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[quote=gbocmusic]@OnceARunnr Are you talking about a national championship runner out of high school?[/quote] ? Yes, she was out of high school. Actually, she had already earned an undergrad degree but hadn't used all of her college eligiblity. There are grad students running all across this country. I won't mention the schools that she went to -- for fear of insulting them -- but she ran 2:15 faster for 5K for us than she did at one of the schools she attended.
gbocmusic wrote:
@OnceARunnr Are you talking about a national championship runner out of high school?


?
Yes, she was out of high school. Actually, she had already earned an undergrad degree but hadn't used all of her college eligiblity.
There are grad students running all across this country.
I won't mention the schools that she went to -- for fear of insulting them -- but she ran 2:15 faster for 5K for us than she did at one of the schools she attended.
05/19/2011 7:41:37 PM
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[quote=gohsrunners]@OnceARunnr You make really good points about investigating other scholastic-athletic options besides D I and D III. I agree with all your points except that I don't think milesplit's "college signings" should be restricted to kids who have signed LOI's - but you are right it is a bit misleading. Maybe it should be renamed "college commitments" or "college decisions" and then it would be clear that it includes all student-athletes who have committed to competing in college. Certainly, not all the athletes listed under the "college signings" section are getting athletic scholarships![/quote] @gohsrunners True. And I wonder if this gives a false impression? I like your idea of "college commitments" or "college decisions." I had one high school coach ask me how much money one of his runners was going to receive. So I told the amount. Then he asked how much was athletic? He kept a running total of the athletic scholarships but not overall scholarship money. He seemed mad that this individual only received $2,500 athletic (but earned $18,000 academic). I figure money is money! It spends the same.
gohsrunners wrote:
@OnceARunnr You make really good points about investigating other scholastic-athletic options besides D I and D III. I agree with all your points except that I don't think milesplit's "college signings" should be restricted to kids who have signed LOI's - but you are right it is a bit misleading. Maybe it should be renamed "college commitments" or "college decisions" and then it would be clear that it includes all student-athletes who have committed to competing in college. Certainly, not all the athletes listed under the "college signings" section are getting athletic scholarships!


@gohsrunners

True. And I wonder if this gives a false impression? I like your idea of "college commitments" or "college decisions."

I had one high school coach ask me how much money one of his runners was going to receive. So I told the amount. Then he asked how much was athletic? He kept a running total of the athletic scholarships but not overall scholarship money.
He seemed mad that this individual only received $2,500 athletic (but earned $18,000 academic).
I figure money is money! It spends the same.

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