Poll: Why do African(Kenya&Ethiopia) runners dominate from 800m-marathon?

Option Votes Score
They work extremely hard /work ethic 13 72%
It's mostly "natural ability" 2 11%
Best tactical runners 0%
Overwhelming desire to extricate themselves from poverty 2 11%
Mental toughness 0%
They are over rated 1 6%
18 Votes

Vote!
Why do African(Kenya&Ethiopia) runners dominate from 800m-marathon?
08/28/2011 6:36:06 PM
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08/28/2011 7:54:25 PM
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we dont need a poll for this...its obvious, all they do is run and its obvious hard work is involved..Therunna OUT
we dont need a poll for this...its obvious, all they do is run and its obvious hard work is involved..Therunna OUT
08/29/2011 12:14:04 AM
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I've been doing some really deep research into this topic for the past few years and after all of this research I have come to my conclusion as to why they dominate. The reason that they dominate is because [b]they're black[/b]. Enough said.
I've been doing some really deep research into this topic for the past few years and after all of this research I have come to my conclusion as to why they dominate. The reason that they dominate is because they're black. Enough said.
08/29/2011 10:49:01 AM
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@Runner_for_life just to really deny the genetics argument, which Somalian RAISED runners have broken 14 let alone 13 minutes for 5000? There is a reason Kenya cleans their clocks every time.
@Runner_for_life

just to really deny the genetics argument, which Somalian RAISED runners have broken 14 let alone 13 minutes for 5000? There is a reason Kenya cleans their clocks every time.
08/29/2011 10:56:25 AM
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Evidently they work harder and they have great mental toughness.. They train 2-3 times a day maybe 4. Now maybe genetics and geographically sufficient environment has a small hand in it but it's mostly the hard work and determination. Most Canadians, Americans, Europeans, etc. train but once or MAYBE twice a day! Look at our last dominant figure in the marathon, Jerome Drayton trained twice a day, everyday and 3 times when he got the chance. All this while maintaining a day job and a social life. So to say we can't train that way is not true. Our current marathon extraordinaires are training in a very similar fashion which is why they are seeing success! It's all in the work ethic and the head! You gotta want to be the best if you wanna train like the best!
Evidently they work harder and they have great mental toughness.. They train 2-3 times a day maybe 4. Now maybe genetics and geographically sufficient environment has a small hand in it but it's mostly the hard work and determination. Most Canadians, Americans, Europeans, etc. train but once or MAYBE twice a day! Look at our last dominant figure in the marathon, Jerome Drayton trained twice a day, everyday and 3 times when he got the chance. All this while maintaining a day job and a social life. So to say we can't train that way is not true. Our current marathon extraordinaires are training in a very similar fashion which is why they are seeing success! It's all in the work ethic and the head! You gotta want to be the best if you wanna train like the best!
08/29/2011 7:24:12 PM
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@Raymond some other reasons: 1) I agree that they work very very hard for a long time. 2) There are many Ethiopians and Kenyans trying to reach the top. If 10 get injured, more will be there to replace them. 3) Like hockey in Canada, it is the thing to do. I remember reading how kids in Ethiopia went to the races in Addis Ababa on the weekends to watch 8 - 10 heats of 10,000s. We can't even get a field together for national championships. The best talent enters track. 4) It is a road to riches and is followed closely in these countries.
@Raymond
some other reasons:
1) I agree that they work very very hard for a long time.

2) There are many Ethiopians and Kenyans trying to reach the top. If 10 get injured, more will be there to replace them.

3) Like hockey in Canada, it is the thing to do. I remember reading how kids in Ethiopia went to the races in Addis Ababa on the weekends to watch 8 - 10 heats of 10,000s. We can't even get a field together for national championships. The best talent enters track.

4) It is a road to riches and is followed closely in these countries.
08/29/2011 11:24:08 PM
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Where do there kicks come from? It's quite obvious where their endurance comes from, but what about their speed? And how come they can put it all together and have unreal finishing speed?
Where do there kicks come from?
It's quite obvious where their endurance comes from, but what about their speed? And how come they can put it all together and have unreal finishing speed?
08/30/2011 4:55:36 PM
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@veg602 Kicking at the end of the race has a lot to do with Endurance and endurance has a lot to do with speed. You can not choose your distance; it chooses you. The faster you are, the easier it is to run for an extended period of time at a given slower pace. This is called speed reserve. Many great distance runners are fast sprinters. The winner of the men's 10,000m in Korea, finished his last 400m in 52.1. What could he do in a flat 400m? My guess is that we have few 10,000m runners who can run 52.1 for a flat 400m and many of our 1500m runners can barely run that fast. Many in Canada think they are sprinters if they run fairly fast at 200 and 400m. how many 48 and 49 sec 400m runners do we have that should be training to run 800s and 1500s. In high school in Kenya, Pamela Jelimo was a very fast 200m (sub 24) and 400m runner (sub 54). She decided to move up to 800m And run the necessary distance. While she sprinted in HS, she also ran cross country and ran quite a bit of distance at a younger age. (This would never happen in Canada). In Canada, our young sprinters are typically in poor condition and do not run distance as a good overall fitness program. At 19, she won the Olympic gold medal at 800m.
@veg602
Kicking at the end of the race has a lot to do with Endurance and endurance has a lot to do with speed. You can not choose your distance; it chooses you.

The faster you are, the easier it is to run for an extended period of time at a given slower pace. This is called speed reserve. Many great distance runners are fast sprinters. The winner of the men's 10,000m in Korea, finished his last 400m in 52.1. What could he do in a flat 400m? My guess is that we have few 10,000m runners who can run 52.1 for a flat 400m and many of our 1500m runners can barely run that fast.

Many in Canada think they are sprinters if they run fairly fast at 200 and 400m. how many 48 and 49 sec 400m runners do we have that should be training to run 800s and 1500s.

In high school in Kenya, Pamela Jelimo was a very fast 200m (sub 24) and 400m runner (sub 54). She decided to move up to 800m And run the necessary distance. While she sprinted in HS, she also ran cross country and ran quite a bit of distance at a younger age. (This would never happen in Canada). In Canada, our young sprinters are typically in poor condition and do not run distance as a good overall fitness program.

At 19, she won the Olympic gold medal at 800m.
08/30/2011 5:17:01 PM
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[quote=Raymond]Most Canadians, Americans, Europeans, etc. train but once or MAYBE twice a day![/quote] @Raymond Actually, most don't train once a day. More like 5 times a week, dropping 2 runs a week due to lame excuses.
Raymond wrote:
Most Canadians, Americans, Europeans, etc. train but once or MAYBE twice a day!


@Raymond Actually, most don't train once a day. More like 5 times a week, dropping 2 runs a week due to lame excuses.
09/01/2011 5:12:20 PM
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Kenya continues to produce The Kenyans have figured out how to inspire the next generation. At St. Patrick’s High School in the town of Iten, which has produced numerous world and Olympic champions, there is a parade of Olympians in front of the kids after every Olympics. Gold medallists are honoured by having their names attached to trees on the school grounds. Stephen Cherono remembers watching his older brother, Christopher Kosgei, train with the other runners in Eldoret, Kenya. Kosgei returned from the 1999 world championships with the gold medal in the steeplechase. The impression on Cherono was clear. He went on to become a world record holder in the event under his new name, Saif Saaeed Shaheen, and won back-to-back world titles in 2003 and 2005. Shaheen changed his name at the same time he turned his Kenyan passport in for a Qatari one. Reports said he was paid $1 million US to represent Qatar. But when I asked him if it was true, he just laughed and said, “If I had a million dollars, do you think I would still be running?” His response reveals much about his purpose in competing. Success in running means one can escape the simple life and can help his or her family and village. Shaheen pays the school fees of his brothers and sisters and helps villagers with their needs. He does admit that he is to receive $1,000 US a month for life. When Abubaker Kaki was visited by the national coach of his native Sudan and offered three square meals a day, a cot to sleep on every night and athletic gear, he recognized a no-brainer and immediately moved to the capital city of Khartoum, against his father’s wishes. His coach told me Kaki is easy to coach because his mantra is “What do I do next, coach?” and on Tuesday he took the 800m silver medal behind Kenya’s David Rudisha. He has also has won two world indoor titles. Learn from the best The point is that there are more important things that motivate athletes than shoe contracts and agents and having the best facilities to train on. Those things all help, but there has to be a desire to succeed first. The distance running success of Kalenjin tribesmen in Kenya has spilled over the border to Uganda. Kalenjins have traditionally migrated back and forth, and now we are seeing Ugandans making finals in distance events. The oil-rich states of Bahrain and Qatar have been recruiting Kenyans for the past decade. Canadian distance runners can expect to face as many as nine Kenyan-born runners in London, not to mention the Ethiopians and Eritreans. Athletes who arrive at the world championships measuring their personal bests against others are in for a rude awakening. One Canadian athlete here told me he was proud that he was one of the youngest athletes in his event, even though he didn’t make the final in Daegu. Well, there are 17- and 18-year-olds in Kenya who, given the opportunity, could be finalists at the world championships, but the depth in that country is so incredible that they may never appear anywhere outside Kenya except in a road race. British distance runner Mo Farah thought he was a professional athlete until his agent recommended he go and live with the Kenyans. He quickly learned everything they do is to make themselves better athletes. He took the 10,000m silver medal here, losing only to a Japan-based Ethiopian. Our athletes must lay down their mobile phones, cut back their Facebook and Twitter time, train harder, learn from the best, and have blind faith in whatever training program they receive. The alternative is to take up chess. How many medals will Canada finish with at the world track and field championships? Peace Out.....Dr.Heartons Read more: http://www.cbc.ca/sports/track/story/2011/08/31/sp-worlds-canada-gains.html#ixzz1WjgFGRpA
Kenya continues to produce

The Kenyans have figured out how to inspire the next generation. At St. Patrick’s High School in the town of Iten, which has produced numerous world and Olympic champions, there is a parade of Olympians in front of the kids after every Olympics. Gold medallists are honoured by having their names attached to trees on the school grounds.

Stephen Cherono remembers watching his older brother, Christopher Kosgei, train with the other runners in Eldoret, Kenya. Kosgei returned from the 1999 world championships with the gold medal in the steeplechase. The impression on Cherono was clear. He went on to become a world record holder in the event under his new name, Saif Saaeed Shaheen, and won back-to-back world titles in 2003 and 2005.

Shaheen changed his name at the same time he turned his Kenyan passport in for a Qatari one. Reports said he was paid $1 million US to represent Qatar. But when I asked him if it was true, he just laughed and said, “If I had a million dollars, do you think I would still be running?”

His response reveals much about his purpose in competing. Success in running means one can escape the simple life and can help his or her family and village. Shaheen pays the school fees of his brothers and sisters and helps villagers with their needs. He does admit that he is to receive $1,000 US a month for life.

When Abubaker Kaki was visited by the national coach of his native Sudan and offered three square meals a day, a cot to sleep on every night and athletic gear, he recognized a no-brainer and immediately moved to the capital city of Khartoum, against his father’s wishes.

His coach told me Kaki is easy to coach because his mantra is “What do I do next, coach?” and on Tuesday he took the 800m silver medal behind Kenya’s David Rudisha. He has also has won two world indoor titles.

Learn from the best

The point is that there are more important things that motivate athletes than shoe contracts and agents and having the best facilities to train on. Those things all help, but there has to be a desire to succeed first.

The distance running success of Kalenjin tribesmen in Kenya has spilled over the border to Uganda. Kalenjins have traditionally migrated back and forth, and now we are seeing Ugandans making finals in distance events. The oil-rich states of Bahrain and Qatar have been recruiting Kenyans for the past decade. Canadian distance runners can expect to face as many as nine Kenyan-born runners in London, not to mention the Ethiopians and Eritreans.

Athletes who arrive at the world championships measuring their personal bests against others are in for a rude awakening. One Canadian athlete here told me he was proud that he was one of the youngest athletes in his event, even though he didn’t make the final in Daegu. Well, there are 17- and 18-year-olds in Kenya who, given the opportunity, could be finalists at the world championships, but the depth in that country is so incredible that they may never appear anywhere outside Kenya except in a road race.

British distance runner Mo Farah thought he was a professional athlete until his agent recommended he go and live with the Kenyans. He quickly learned everything they do is to make themselves better athletes. He took the 10,000m silver medal here, losing only to a Japan-based Ethiopian.

Our athletes must lay down their mobile phones, cut back their Facebook and Twitter time, train harder, learn from the best, and have blind faith in whatever training program they receive. The alternative is to take up chess.

How many medals will Canada finish with at the world track and field championships?

Peace Out.....Dr.Heartons

Read more: http://www.cbc.ca/sports/track/story/2011/08/31/sp-worlds-canada-gains.html#ixzz1WjgFGRpA
09/01/2011 6:25:52 PM
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@DrHeartons One thing nobody mentions is the level of training groups that the Kenyans have. When I was in high school, my dad started the Quinte Legion Track Club in Belleville so that all of the decent runners at different schools could come together and work and push each other. We all got a lot better as is the case with every track club. When you think about how competitive hockey is in Canada, the kids striving to make the NHL or even a local all-star team are forced to keep improving just to have any chance and Kenyan running is the same way. We have a constant stream of kids with personal trainers helping them improve their dryland at the fitness club where I do Aikido. This is a huge time committment and expense for parents but the holy grail known as hockey seems to be worth it to them. In Kenya, the level of running is so amazing that someone 20th or so on their depth chart for 10k would be one of the best in any other country which means any events they have contain world class competition (imagine a random allcomers meet where 10 guys show up and run sub 13:30 for 5k!) We need a lot more events like the NTL that will get the up and coming track athletes competing against each other more regularly which will help everyone elevate their game but this country is so big that it is very costly to bring all of the top athletes together throughout the summer and a reason why some of the events at our national championships don't have many entries. Spending more money making this type of event happen seems like a better use of the athletics funding than sending 19 officials to the worlds for 32 athletes.
@DrHeartons

One thing nobody mentions is the level of training groups that the Kenyans have. When I was in high school, my dad started the Quinte Legion Track Club in Belleville so that all of the decent runners at different schools could come together and work and push each other. We all got a lot better as is the case with every track club. When you think about how competitive hockey is in Canada, the kids striving to make the NHL or even a local all-star team are forced to keep improving just to have any chance and Kenyan running is the same way. We have a constant stream of kids with personal trainers helping them improve their dryland at the fitness club where I do Aikido. This is a huge time committment and expense for parents but the holy grail known as hockey seems to be worth it to them. In Kenya, the level of running is so amazing that someone 20th or so on their depth chart for 10k would be one of the best in any other country which means any events they have contain world class competition (imagine a random allcomers meet where 10 guys show up and run sub 13:30 for 5k!) We need a lot more events like the NTL that will get the up and coming track athletes competing against each other more regularly which will help everyone elevate their game but this country is so big that it is very costly to bring all of the top athletes together throughout the summer and a reason why some of the events at our national championships don't have many entries. Spending more money making this type of event happen seems like a better use of the athletics funding than sending 19 officials to the worlds for 32 athletes.
09/01/2011 7:49:31 PM
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@CoachFaulds I agree with both you and 'bryano' on your posts on this topic. I attend as many track events as possible because I enjoy them but also because I want to show my support. I would like to see more posts on what interested fans can do to make a great sport grow in Canada. Thanks for your comment......Dr.Heartons
@CoachFaulds
I agree with both you and 'bryano' on your posts on this topic.
I attend as many track events as possible because I enjoy them but also because I want to show my support.
I would like to see more posts on what interested fans can do to make a great sport grow in Canada.
Thanks for your comment......Dr.Heartons
09/02/2011 12:02:10 AM
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There is a reason why at the moment, Kenya's main rival in the steeple is France and not Ethiopia: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mid32OSTc7M&feature=related
There is a reason why at the moment, Kenya's main rival in the steeple is France and not Ethiopia:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mid32OSTc7M&feature=related
09/02/2011 2:29:28 PM
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There is clearly not one distinct reason why runners from these countries dominate the distance events. I don't pretend to be an expert, but I would say that one of the primary reasons is how large a part running is in the lives of many of these people. Imagine if children in Canada got into and were as involved in running as they are in hockey. On top of this, imagine that kids in Canada all suffered from extreme poverty, which could be eliminated for them and their entire families by continuing with the sport. Now picture that these kids had as many (or more) running groups and clubs to facilitate this continuation as there are hockey and soccer teams for kids in Canada. It's really not that surprising that these countries have the success they do.
There is clearly not one distinct reason why runners from these countries dominate the distance events. I don't pretend to be an expert, but I would say that one of the primary reasons is how large a part running is in the lives of many of these people. Imagine if children in Canada got into and were as involved in running as they are in hockey. On top of this, imagine that kids in Canada all suffered from extreme poverty, which could be eliminated for them and their entire families by continuing with the sport. Now picture that these kids had as many (or more) running groups and clubs to facilitate this continuation as there are hockey and soccer teams for kids in Canada. It's really not that surprising that these countries have the success they do.
09/02/2011 3:53:13 PM
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This is the same for every country in every sport. They are all strong in certain sports and weak in others. More funding goes to one over another. It is just the way it is, why is the US the best at basketball and football, why is Great Britain and Italy so strong in cycling, Spain in soocer. They are the most popular sports in that country. Pick any sport, and you can think of the country that dominates it, whether it be from one pro athlete who made was so big there, i.e Lance Armstrong making cycling popular in the US.
This is the same for every country in every sport. They are all strong in certain sports and weak in others. More funding goes to one over another. It is just the way it is, why is the US the best at basketball and football, why is Great Britain and Italy so strong in cycling, Spain in soocer. They are the most popular sports in that country. Pick any sport, and you can think of the country that dominates it, whether it be from one pro athlete who made was so big there, i.e Lance Armstrong making cycling popular in the US.
09/02/2011 3:57:42 PM
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[quote=ERL_19]There is a reason why at the moment, Kenya's main rival in the steeple is France and not Ethiopia: [/quote] @ERL_19 I thought that Mahiedine Mekhissi-Benabbad was of Algerian descent. Also was anyone else hoping he would box the guy who cut him off like he did to Mehdi Baala
ERL_19 wrote:
There is a reason why at the moment, Kenya's main rival in the steeple is France and not Ethiopia:


@ERL_19

I thought that Mahiedine Mekhissi-Benabbad was of Algerian descent.

Also was anyone else hoping he would box the guy who cut him off like he did to Mehdi Baala
09/02/2011 4:30:42 PM
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When Africans began to realise some years ago that they could literally run themselves to a better life.......it was easy to see what the choice would be.....poverty?or a much better life ? Dr.Heartons
When Africans began to realise some years ago that they could literally run themselves to a better life.......it was easy to see what the choice would be.....poverty?or a much better life ?
Dr.Heartons
09/02/2011 4:36:57 PM
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[quote=ERL_19]There is a reason why at the moment, Kenya's main rival in the steeple is France and not Ethiopia: [/quote] @ERL_19 Because Algeria is just across the pond and nobody immigrates to Ethiopia.
ERL_19 wrote:
There is a reason why at the moment, Kenya's main rival in the steeple is France and not Ethiopia:


@ERL_19 Because Algeria is just across the pond and nobody immigrates to Ethiopia.
09/02/2011 4:49:31 PM
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[quote=DrHeartons]I would like to see more posts on what interested fans can do to make a great sport grow in Canada. Thanks for your comment......Dr.Heartons[/quote] @DrHeartons How about stop being an armchair athlete? Or how about instead of bringing up age old topics that are nothing but opinion and speculation? Better yet, how about not making posts and topics based solely for self reference? [quote=DrHeartons]I agree with your post in order to make myself appear to be a likeable person. I also encourage discussion on my own topics but I don't care about the direction, as long as my posts are popular. I'll also talk about myself in the third person, and double sign my name at the end of posts.[/quote]
DrHeartons wrote:
I would like to see more posts on what interested fans can do to make a great sport grow in Canada.
Thanks for your comment......Dr.Heartons


@DrHeartons How about stop being an armchair athlete?

Or how about instead of bringing up age old topics that are nothing but opinion and speculation?

Better yet, how about not making posts and topics based solely for self reference?

DrHeartons wrote:
I agree with your post in order to make myself appear to be a likeable person. I also encourage discussion on my own topics but I don't care about the direction, as long as my posts are popular. I'll also talk about myself in the third person, and double sign my name at the end of posts.
09/02/2011 5:42:33 PM
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Joined: Oct 2010
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@gazoo a quick Wikipedia search clears things up Bob Tahri: maybe Algerian Origin, French Born (Metz, NE France) Mahiedine Mekhissi-Benabbad: Algerian Origin, French Born (Reims, NE France) unlike football, we've seen that the top Moroccans and Algerians are competing for their own nation in athletics. What is there really for the next generation of Ethiopians and Americans who take up athletics to get motivated about in the steeplechase? @prettygutless the French filed a protest and it got rightfully thrown out. it would have been hilarious is he tried to fight Kiplagat, but people seem to forget that the french are developing a reputation for domestic fighting in sport (anyone remember the world cup of football?). Aparantly, MMB does not get along with some guy who Baala trains with and this is part of the reason why they fought.
@gazoo

a quick Wikipedia search clears things up

Bob Tahri: maybe Algerian Origin, French Born (Metz, NE France)
Mahiedine Mekhissi-Benabbad: Algerian Origin, French Born (Reims, NE France)

unlike football, we've seen that the top Moroccans and Algerians are competing for their own nation in athletics.

What is there really for the next generation of Ethiopians and Americans who take up athletics to get motivated about in the steeplechase?

@prettygutless

the French filed a protest and it got rightfully thrown out. it would have been hilarious is he tried to fight Kiplagat, but people seem to forget that the french are developing a reputation for domestic fighting in sport (anyone remember the world cup of football?). Aparantly, MMB does not get along with some guy who Baala trains with and this is part of the reason why they fought.

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